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Sue's Story

Get Thinking

We now invite you to delve a little deeper and explore how your experiences relate to climate change.

 

The good news is that our community has all the tools and knowledge we need to avert the worst effects of climate change, so all we need now is for everyone to act!

 

Sue’s life-long connection to Bude, and her way of noticing the world around herself, means her story contains many links to important environmental issues. We heard a touching commitment to protecting the ocean from the harm of plastic, and a startling first-hand account of the changes to Bude’s coastline. With so many local projects in Bude looking after our coast and sea, there are plenty of ways to get involved.

  • Storms
    As temperatures increase, the amount of water that evaporates into the atmosphere increases and is released as extreme rain, hail and snowfall. Storms passing over warmer water absorb more energy, increasing wind intensity. In Bude this means an increased risk of storm surges and flooding. Numerous waterways in and around Bude put many of us in river catchments and we therefore need to think seriously about how we can adapt to flood risks. Floods damage not only our homes and livelihoods, but also impact on water safety. Our outdated drainage systems cannot cope with additional water flows, which leads to sewage being discharged into rivers, making its way onto our beaches at Crooklets and Summerleaze.
  • Heat Waves
    In the UK we now experience twice as many warm spells a year, as in the 1990s. In 2020, 2,556 heat-related deaths were recorded, a figure predicted to increase threefold by 2050. What may feel to some like a beautiful summer’s day can put others under extreme stress. People with underlying health conditions or over 65, as well as young children and those on low incomes are particularly vulnerable to heat stress as they are less able to adapt to the heat. But as temperatures continue to rise we are starting to see fit and healthy people being affected too.
  • Extreme Cold
    Weather systems are highly complex, so although it seems strange, climate change also increases the risk of extremely cold weather events, as we saw in March 2018 with the ‘Beast from the East’, which brought icy temperatures and snow even to Cornwall.
  • Droughts and Wildfires
    As the climate changes, we’ll experience more rain falling but less frequently, which means more flash floods and more periods of drought. This combination of factors leaves us susceptible to drought and therefore wildfires, as land and vegetation dry out. Already we’re seeing changes – in 2020, Cornwall Fire and Rescue attended 80% more wildfires than the previous year.
  • Water Shortages
    By 2050 water demand will outstrip supply as the population continues to grow and water availability reduces, according to predictions by the UK Committee on Climate Change. In the UK we use an average of 143 litres per day per person and water conservation is essential for reducing drought and wildfire risk.

Get Inspired

We have put together some tips on what we as individuals and collectively as a community can do to have the greatest positive impact. These changes will not only improve the quality of life for everyone in our area, but also reduce contributions to worsening climate change.

 

Flooding is an important issue for our community, so we have covered it in depth in Simon’s Story. The following tips are what we can do to protect our oceans and coastline.

  • Storms
    As temperatures increase, the amount of water that evaporates into the atmosphere increases and is released as extreme rain, hail and snowfall. Storms passing over warmer water absorb more energy, increasing wind intensity. In Bude this means an increased risk of storm surges and flooding. Numerous waterways in and around Bude put many of us in river catchments and we therefore need to think seriously about how we can adapt to flood risks. Floods damage not only our homes and livelihoods, but also impact on water safety. Our outdated drainage systems cannot cope with additional water flows, which leads to sewage being discharged into rivers, making its way onto our beaches at Crooklets and Summerleaze.
  • Heat Waves
    In the UK we now experience twice as many warm spells a year, as in the 1990s. In 2020, 2,556 heat-related deaths were recorded, a figure predicted to increase threefold by 2050. What may feel to some like a beautiful summer’s day can put others under extreme stress. People with underlying health conditions or over 65, as well as young children and those on low incomes are particularly vulnerable to heat stress as they are less able to adapt to the heat. But as temperatures continue to rise we are starting to see fit and healthy people being affected too.
  • Extreme Cold
    Weather systems are highly complex, so although it seems strange, climate change also increases the risk of extremely cold weather events, as we saw in March 2018 with the ‘Beast from the East’, which brought icy temperatures and snow even to Cornwall.
  • Droughts and Wildfires
    As the climate changes, we’ll experience more rain falling but less frequently, which means more flash floods and more periods of drought. This combination of factors leaves us susceptible to drought and therefore wildfires, as land and vegetation dry out. Already we’re seeing changes – in 2020, Cornwall Fire and Rescue attended 80% more wildfires than the previous year.
  • Water Shortages
    By 2050 water demand will outstrip supply as the population continues to grow and water availability reduces, according to predictions by the UK Committee on Climate Change. In the UK we use an average of 143 litres per day per person and water conservation is essential for reducing drought and wildfire risk.

Get Sharing

Stories trigger more stories,

so we hope this has sparked some of your own memories and

provided an opportunity to reflect. 

Can you think of a place in nature

that’s particularly special to you?

How does it make you feel being there?

-

What do you feel are the benefits

of being out in nature?

-

Have you witnessed any changes

to the coastline around Bude?

-

Does being out in the natural environment contribute to your wellbeing?

Can you describe the benefits?

-

Have you noticed a difference

in what washes up on the beaches?

Get Together

If you’re part of a local group and would like to explore this theme more through additional activities, then you might like to use our ‘Hands On’ toolkits. Contact Us to find out more.

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Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Sue's Story

Get Involved

Bude is already bursting at the seams with enthusiastic environmental groups and

great initiatives if you want to get involved with. Here’s a few:

2 Minute Foundation

Help reduce plastic waste in the

marine environment with a

two-minute beach clean.

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Thank You

We hope our suggestions and advice leave you feeling inspired. Climate change can be challenging to think and talk about, so if any of your questions haven’t been answered or you need support or you have an idea you want to pursue, then please get in touch with the Bude Climate Partnership. We’re here to help you.

This Toolkit has been developed by Storylines.

Storylines is a Community Interest Company who use the common language of story to bring people together to share, celebrate, learn and connect.  Storylines supports organisations and communities to unearth and share their own stories through bespoke story projectsdigital storytellingeducation, oral historyworkshopsinterpretation

training and consultancy.

Share your memories and reflections here

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