To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Lochy's Story

Get Thinking

Lochy is 16 years old and talks extremely eloquently of his love of nature and his heartfelt concern for his generation’s future. Unfortunately, Lochy is not the only young person attempting to make sense of a rapidly changing world. A shocking 59% of young people state they are extremely worried about climate change, with 50% reporting feelings of hopelessness, anxiety, anger, powerlessness and guilt, and 45% saying these feelings negatively impact on their daily lives.

Young people are not the only ones struggling with these complex emotions. Climate anxiety, as it is currently known, can affect anyone of us, especially once we start to understand the enormity of the challenge ahead. For many of us, the best remedy is to become more active in pushing for the changes we want to see in our communities and in the wider world. However, it can take time to navigate our way through to action, and the process can be challenging.

The good news is that our community has all the tools and knowledge we need to avert the worst effects of climate change, so all we need now is for everyone to act!

It is important to remember that if you are feeling like anxious about climate change and the future, it is a perfectly natural and healthy response to a high stress situation. Talking about it with friends or community members who understand is the first step to feeling better.

Get Inspired

The climate is changing at a rate and in unpredictable ways that mean we are facing a deeply uncertain future. The scale of the problem can feel totally out of our control, and we can experience a sense of crippling powerlessness. For adults and young people alike, confronting this reality can result in negative feelings which can impact on our mental health. If left unaddressed, climate anxiety could progress into depression, anxiety disorder and substance misuse, with young people most at risk.

With this in mind we have compiled some tips on how we can all look out for one another and transform our individual worries into meaningful and positive action, building a stronger community for the future.

Get Sharing

Stories trigger more stories,

so we hope this has sparked some of your own memories and

provided an opportunity to reflect. 

What are your earliest memories of being out in nature? Did you learn anything and has this stayed with you throughout your life?

-

Did you worry about the changing climate when you were young? Can you imagine what it would be like to grow up with that concern?

-

Have you found any antidotes to help you through stressful or anxious times? Does nature play a role?

-

Do you ever discuss the climate crisis and the damage humans are doing to nature with your friends? How does that feel?

-

Young people will bear the brunt of the climate crisis in years to come. How do you feel about this and how are you taking action to lessen the impacts on them?

Get Together

If you’re part of a local group and would like to explore this theme more through additional activities, then you might like to use our Hands On toolkits. Contact Us to find out more.

toolkits 122_edited.jpg

Teachers wanting to use these stories in the classroom can download additional resources here.

Dive Deeper

To find out more about climate anxiety, and what you can do to manage it, the following website offers a basic overview and additional resources.

The Climate Psychology Alliance

provides resources, podcasts, and support groups should you, or anyone you care for, need it, or if you want to dig a little deeper

Some books that may be of interest:

Active Hope by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone – for anyone seeking a new way to frame how we are feeling and looking for a way to positive action

 

Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer –

if you are interested in other world views, this book offers a beautiful insight into how Native American Indian culture embodies nature, and how we can learn from its ancient wisdom.

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Lochy's Story

Get Involved

Here are a few suggestions on how you might use your own skills to get involved.

Some of us may need additional support with our mental health, or to make sense of the reality we face,

before we can even think about where to go next.

The Pearl Exchange

offers support for the 18–30-year-olds. Set up by people from our own community for the benefit of our community, they work to support young adults at what can be a difficult time of life, providing practical support and opportunities for creative, nature and cultural engagement. 

pearl exchange.jpg

Thank You

We hope our suggestions and advice leave you feeling inspired. climate change can be challenging to think and talk about, so if any of your questions haven’t been answered or you need support or you have an idea you want to pursue, then please get in touch with the Bude Climate Partnership. We’re here to help you.

This Toolkit has been developed by Storylines.

Storylines is a Community Interest Company who use the common language of story to bring people together to share, celebrate, learn and connect.  Storylines supports organisations and communities to unearth and share their own stories through bespoke story projectsdigital storytellingeducation, oral historyworkshopsinterpretation

training and consultancy.

To play, press and hold the enter key. To stop, release the enter key.

Share your memories and reflections here